Tag Archives: Film

Svengali Review – Filmoria

Svengali

Dixie – Johnny Owen’s plucky Welshman at the centre of this music biz romantic dramedy – is a well observed creation; an endlessly likeable schmo with a passion for music and an insatiable need to make it big managing a band. He moves to London with his girlfriend Shell (the just-as-pluckyVicky McClure) to bring superstardom to a talented but juvenile online discovery, The Premature Congratulations, but his idealistic, naïve temperament soon comes to blows with the ruthlessness of the big city scene…

Read my full review at Filmoria

Scroobius Pip // Exclusive Rhythm Circus Interview

Interview originally published at Rhythm Circus

Scroobius Pip

Scroobius Pip – the bearded face of the UK’s spoken word scene – is hosting a monthly film night at London’s coolest indie picture-house, The Prince Charles Cinema. Kicking off with Spanish time-travel thriller Time Crimes (click here for tickets), Pip’s mission is to take his London fans on a journey through his cinematic tastes and Rhythm Circus is along for the ride.

Naturally we wanted to know more and Pip, ever the gracious gent, agreed to answer a fistful of our geekiest questions…

The first question has to be about facial hair I’m afraid. Who has the most outstanding beard in cinema? 
Me when I finally make my transition over to film! For now I’d have to give the long term crown to Brian Blessed. Never has a beard looked so good.

Tell us the story behind your night at the Prince Charles? 
Well, I have been a fan of the place for years and, to be honest, I think they got sick of me arguing with them on Twitter about what they should and shouldn’t screen. So they agreed to give me my own monthly night where I can introduce a film of my choice and then host a Q&A or panel of some sort afterwards. I cant wait!

Time CrimesWe hear you are kicking off the series with Nacho Vigalondo’s mindbending Timecrimes, an under-seen Spanish indie rather than an established cult flick. Interesting choice…
Well, when I saw Harvey at the Prince Charles it struck me how amazing it was to see, on the big screen, one of my favourite films that I had only ever watched at home. So when choosing my films for this run I wanted to pick stuff that a) I loved, and b) many people either wont have seen OR simply wont have seen on the big screen.
Timecrimes seems to me to be one of the great overlooked films. Partly, I feel, to the tone of it being completely lost when the title is translated into English! Lets face it, Timecrimes sounds like an Arnie or Van Damme film.
I am currently working on getting a video introduction from Nacho himself and will have a panel afterwards where a physicist will discuss theories of time travel and I, along with film nerd and comedian Rich Sandling, will discuss the subjects of good films with bad names and the general horror of what can be lost in translation.

Let’s talk mainstream: what’s been your favourite cinema going experience of the summer?
Tough question! I LOVE the cinema and try to go four or five times a month. I think Alpha Papa has to take it though. Such a huge Alan Partridge fan, and I was worried about how they would pull it all off, but I absolutely loved it.

As a man with a penchant for the spoken word, you must be particularly attuned to dialogue when you’re watching a film. Do you have a favourite line?
It would either be Elwood P Dowd’s speech towards the end of Harvey (ending with) “….for years I was smart… I recommend pleasant” or Lloyd Dobler in Say Anything “I gave her my heart…she gave me a pen…”

We loved the video to Stunner (see below), your new track with dan le sac. It seemed like the video might have been influenced by the films of Gaspar Noe (Irreversible, Enter the Void). Was this intentional? 
It wasn’t intentional but I do produce and direct my own videos and I’m a MASSIVE fan of Gaspar so it’s lovely to hear that has some how come through. Irreversible is hopefully going to be the third film in my run of monthly nights at the Prince Charles. I remember seeing that on its initial short cinema release and being overwhelmed by the experience.
Similarly when Gaspar came over to do a Q&A and screening of Enter the Void. I think Enter the Void was the first film I saw that made me gutted I couldn’t watch it immediately again on DVD. Some of the shots instantly jumped out as having a hugely different impact on DVD compared to on the big screen. Neither better or worse, but it was something I wanted to check straight away!

Finally, if Scroobius Pip and dan le sac had a Lightsaber duel, who would win?
I am gangley and rangy so I therefore think I would have a slight advantage.

Be sure not to miss Scroobius Pip Presents… Timecrimes at the Prince Charles Cinema this Thursday. We’ll see you there.

For more info, and tickets, visit: PRINCE CHARLES CINEMA

Deranged (1974)

Deranged Review

Director: Jeff Gillen, Alan Ormsby
Screenwriter: Alan Ormsby
Cast:  Roberts Blossom, Cosette Lee, Leslie Carlson
Runtime: 84 mins
Certificate: 18
Release Date: Out now on BR BUY NOW FROM ARROW VIDEO

derangedbedOf the films inspired by Wisconsin body-snatcher Ed Gein, Jeff Gillen and Alan Ormsby’s 1974 oddity Deranged steers closest to the truth, the opening narration informing us that only the names of the characters have been changed: a quick Wikipedia search will prove its accuracy. Our subject, Ezra Cobb, is less of a Movie Monster than Norman Bates or Leatherface and the low key settings route his exploits in a more mundane realm than Bate’s Motel or even Texas Chainsaw’s backstreets.

Read the full review of DERANGED @ RHYTHM CIRCUS

Shell – Review


SHELL (Foto peliÌ-cula) 337

Director: Scott Graham
Screenwriter: Scott Graham,
Cast: Chloe Pirrie, Joseph Mawle, Iain De Caestecker, Michael Smiley
Runtime: 90 mins
Certificate: 15
Release Date: In Cinemas March 15

Scott Graham’s first feature is as bleak as its Scottish Highland setting. Confined almost entirely to a remote petrol station, this is a frustrating struggle of a picture which considers the effects of isolation, depression and illness on the relationship between a father (Joseph Mawle) and his daughter, the eponymous Shell (Chloe Pirrie).

The Scandinavian influences are well pronounced, Yoliswa Gärtig’s widescreen digital photography capturing the harsh beauty of the landscape and picking out the fragility of Shell’s world which rumbles and rattles as lorries pass along their highland road. With a careful use of close-ups and diagetic sound we are forced into a tactile relationship with this uncomfortable world that will make you shiver, wince and gasp. The narrative also echoes the Dogme movement, events unfolding laboriously with a focus on tedium and the kind of jobs that get dirt under your fingernails. With its slight nature, lack of sensational material or use of music (a few lovely key moments aside), this is low-key storytelling that manages to be enthralling in its own way … Read more @ Rhythm Circus

Shell is screening in selected cinemas from tomorrow. Buy tickets here.

Reviews archive

Trailer for Scott Graham’s Shell

40304_largeHaving made significant waves on the festival circuit – including nabbing the Best Film prize at the Turin Film Festival – Scott Graham’s Shell is due for it’s theatrical release on 15th March. The film won’t have you jumping for joy as it’s subject matter and tone are difficult, but this is arresting, beautiful filmmaking with a strong performance from Chloe Pirrie.

My review will be online at Rhythm Circus in the next couple of weeks.

For now, here’s the trailer…

Olly Moss: Celebrating Oscar History

As the Oscars once again draw tender-hookingly near, our cinemas are flushed with pictures of high caliber and film chatter is at a vibrant high. The shmooziness of awards season may induce a groan from those of lesser humour, but it is undeniable that this January it has yielded some absolute delights (check out the below post for Disney’s fantastic nommed short, Paperman).

In the run-up to the ceremony, poster designer Olly Moss has designed this fabulously geeky tribute to each and every Best Pic winner from the then to the now, an artful quiz which film students will now forever covet for their bedroom doors. The obvious ones are indeed obvious – “King of the World” are ya eh Jack? – but the real fun of this is the frustration that takes hold when you find yourself at a loss.

Let the games begin!

olly-moss-oscar-poster